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Research Impact for Law - a self help guide for academics

A guide to measuring your own research impact with a focus on Law resources

Example statements

My work has been well received.  My h-index is already 11 from 24 publications (Scopus).

 

Scopus


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1. Go to Scopus
2. Search for Author name or Title of Paper and click on Author
3. From author profile, click on h-index for h-index summary
 

Note: h-index is also available from Web of Science and is dependent on the dataset

 

h-index Web of Science


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1. Go to Web of Science

2. Click on +More to reveal ‘Author Search’

3. Enter author surname and first initial in labeled boxes

Note: you can click through to select research domains and organisations – this is optional

4. Click ‘Finish Search’

Note: The results will show all articles that match the author but these will be sorted into Article Groups

5. Click on the ‘Article Groups’ link and check all the boxes from the correct author

6. Click on ‘View records’

7. Click ‘Create Citation Report’

h-index Google Scholar


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1. Go to Google Scholar

2. Type the full name of the author

3. If a profile exists for the author, it will appear at the top of the results list

4. Click on the link to view the profile and h-index

Google Scholar

 

h-Index

A method of measuring the productivity and impact of an academic's work

How to record your h-Index automatically in Google Scholar?

The best way is to set up a Google Scholar Citations profile based on your publications indexed in Google Scholar. Google Scholar will then automate the task to measure the following:

The number of your publications (ranked in descending order by number of citations for each) that have collected at least the same number of citations.

You can do this manually. We will explain this below.

The problem with doing that is that your h-index is not easily visible to individuals sitting on decision panels.

The best is to have an openly accessible link to the evidence about your Google Scholar Citations profile and h-index.

How to record your Google Scholar h-index manually via Google Scholar search interface